Adopt a Whale

20.00

For €20 a year you can help us to continue our important work to monitor humpback whales by contributing towards survey day fuel costs, camera equipment, data storage and maintaining the photo-ID catalogues for both species. You can select your whale for adoption using the ‘Choose Your Whale’ dropdown menu below. You will receive an info pack on your adopted whale including your certificate of adoption. You will also receive an annual update on your whale by email at the end of the field season. To learn more about these humpback whales, please scroll down the page.

Please make sure to specify the name that you would like on cert in the notes.

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    Product Description

    Adopt a Whale Biographies

    Boomerang


    Boomerang off West Cork in November 2004 © Mike Brown.

    This individual is known to Irish researchers as #HBIRL3 or as #04532 in the North Atlantic Humpback Whale Catalogue. He was first recorded off Galley Head, Co. Cork in August 2001 and has been documented in 13 of the past 18 years between the Cork and Waterford coast. He spends much of his time feeding in West Cork’s nutrient rich waters between late summer and early winter. So reliable is his annual return that local whale-watchers named him “Boomerang”. Genetic analysis of DNA taken from skin samples confirm Boomerang is a male. He can easily be distinguished from other humpback whales by his damaged dorsal fin, and the unique pattern on the ventral surface of his tail-flukes.

    Your adoption of Boomerang is an important contribution towards our efforts to monitor these magnificent animals into the future to go towards informing appropriate conservation measures to protect Irish humpback whales. Thank you.

    Loopy


    Loopy off Waterford in October 2008 © Pádraig Whooley.

    This animal is known to Irish whale researchers as #HBIRL6 and to the North Atlantic Humpback Whale Catalogue as #04766. He was first recorded off Loop Head, Co. Clare in October 2004 earning him the name “Loopy”. Since then he has been documented in 5 of the past 14 years between the Waterford, Cork, Kerry and Clare coasts. He spends much of his time feeding on shoaling fish in West Cork’s nutrient rich waters between November and December. Genetic analysis of DNA taken from skin samples has confirmed Loopy is a male. He can easily be distinguished from other humpbacks by his dorsal fin shape, and the unique black and white pattern on the ventral surface of his tail-flukes.

    Your adoption of Loopy is an important contribution towards our efforts to monitor these magnificent animals into the future to go towards informing appropriate conservation measures to protect Irish humpback whales.

    Dutchy


    Dutchy off Norway in November 2014 © Fredrik Broms.

    This whale is known to Irish researchers as #HBIRL7, or to the North Atlantic Humpback Whale Catalogue as #04790, was first recorded in Ireland off Toe Head, West Cork in September 2007. He/she was given the nickname “Dutchy”, as it was the first of our humpback whales matched internationally after being recorded off Den Helder and Texel Island in the North Sea, Netherlands, in both May and November 2007 on numerous occasions. Five years later, Dutchy was matched in November 2012 and again in 2014 near Tromso in Norway, 300 km inside the Arctic Circle! This is the furthest north any of the “Irish” humpback whales have been recorded. He/she can easily be easily distinguished from other humpbacks by the extensive white frosting on the left and right sides of its dorsal fin, and the unique black scars on the ventral surface of its right tail-fluke.

    Your adoption of Dutchy is an important contribution towards our efforts to monitor these magnificent animals into the future to go towards informing appropriate conservation measures to protect Irish humpback whales.

    Danu

    Danu In Dingle Bay © Nick Massett

    This whale is known to Irish researchers as #HBIRL17, or to the North Atlantic Humpback Whale Catalogue as #4742. However, we fondly refer to her as Danu. We are confident that she has brought two calves back from the breeding grounds to Kerry; where she has been sighted every year since 2011.

    Your adoption of Danu is an important contribution towards our efforts to monitor these magnificent animals into the future to go towards informing appropriate conservation measures to protect Irish humpback whales. Thank you.

    Queen Medb

    Queen Medb photo was taken off Kerry  © Nick Massett

    This whale is known to Irish researchers as #HBIRL67, or to the North Atlantic Humpback Whale Catalogue as #10435. However, we fondly refer to her as Queen Medb. Just like the Irish warrior queen we suspect this female humpback to be a master of strategy and warfare having survived a killer whale attack. Clear killer whale rake marks on her left ventral fluke are a constant reminder of her fierce battle but also make her distinguishable from other humpback whales.

    Your adoption of Medb is an important contribution towards our efforts to monitor these magnificent animals into the future to go towards informing appropriate conservation measures to protect Irish humpback whales. Thank You.

    Additional information

    Choose Your Whale

    Boomerang, Loopy, Dutchy, Danu, Queen Medb

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