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IRISH WHALE AND DOLPHIN GROUP

IWDG sponsorship of Peter Lawless solo circum-navigation around the world! He will be testing our new IWDG Reporting App during this voyage.
Read our blog post and Watch a short video introducing Peter Lawless at https://iwdg.ie/peter-lawless-to-test-the-iwdg-reporting-app-on-his-solo-circum-navigation-of-the-globe/
@Peterlawlessolo
#iwdg

🐋Show me your BIG heart!
Not only are Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus)the largest animals on Earth capable of reaching lengths of up to 33m,they have also the biggest hearts on the planet and may beat only twice per min. during a dive.
Find out more👉 https://iwdg.ie/species/

It has always been the belief of the IWDG and the Shannon Dolphin Project that industry and high nature conservation sites, such as the Shannon Estuary, can co-exist if respect is shown to the habitats and species exposed to industry.

#DolphinDiscovery #shannonestuary #ESBGroup

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LATEST FROM FACEBOOK
IRISH WHALE AND DOLPHIN GROUP
IWDG sponsorship of Peter Lawless solo circum-navigation around the world!Peter is attempting a solo, unassisted, non-stop circumnavigation of the globe ! This means he will step onboard his 41ft yacht “Waxwing” in Kilrush Marina, Co Clare, Ireland in August and not step foot on land again until he hopefully reaches Kilrush Marina again, nine to ten months later! He will be testing our new IWDG Reporting App during this long voyage which will enables him to log all sightings, including short video, straight onto the App, and when he is in wifi coverage, or when he uses his satellite system, records will be sent directly to the IWDG.Below is a link to read our blog post and Watch a short video introducing Peter Lawless at iwdg.ie/peter-lawless-to-test-the-iwdg-reporting-app-on-his-solo-circum-navigation-of-the-globe/🌐Follow Peter's journey on www.peterlawlesssolocircumnavigation.com#IWDGReportingApp #peterlawlesssolocircumnavigation #Sightings #strandings #IWDGReportingSchemes ... See MoreSee Less
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Walrus returns to Irish waters Mon. 2nd August...... Breaking news, IWDG confirm that the walrus observed this morning off Clonea, Co. Waterford by Cormac Walsh is the same individual photographed off Valentia Island, Co. Kerry on March 14. Full story here iwdg.ie/walrus-returns-to-irish-waters-mon-2nd-august/ ... See MoreSee Less
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🐋 Blue Whale | Balaenoptera musculus | An Míol mór gormShow me your big heart!Not only are blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) the largest animals on Earth capable of reaching lengths of up to 33m, they have also the biggest hearts ♥️ on the planet and may beat only twice a minute during a dive.Other than their large size, their mottled blue skin colour is unique among whales. Depending on light conditions, blue whales may appear light grey in colour. They are more robust than fin whales with a broad, rounded head and a tiny dorsal fin. Their baleen is all black, though may be greyer in older animals. Blue whales have a rudimentary moustache containing four bristles and an adolescent beard of ~40 hairs. Their massive blow can reach up to 12m occurring every 10-20 seconds for 2-6 minutes, after which it may dive anywhere from 5-20 minutes. The enormous splash guard may be seen protruding high out of the water while the rostrum (flat area in front of the splash guard) is flat and rarely breaks the surface. They swim at a speed of about 3-4 knots but have been recorded accelerating to speeds of up to 10-16knots. Blue whales emit low frequency moans (1-3Hz) that can travel for great distances underwater. They also produce ultra-sonic bursts of sound (21-31kHz) when feeding; this may help them detect large concentrations of krill, their primary food. The population is still recovering from the slaughter of 30,000 whales during the height of the Antarctic whaling industry. They are found in oceans worldwide but feed only in the colder waters of the Antarctic, North Pacific and North Atlantic. The discovery of blue whales passing the west coast each winter may mark a slow recovery in the blue whale in Irish waters. Numbers in the North Atlantic may still be as low as 400 individuals. The only significant threat in Irish waters is noise pollution from offshore exploration and drilling along the West Coast. As with most creatures which use low-frequency sound for communication, they are sensitive to acoustic disturbance. Studies have revealed that blue whales are less likely to vocalise in the presence of active SONAR. Find out more about cetacean species at iwdg.ie/species/📸Photograph: Irish AirCorps#bluewhale#iwdg#conservation#research#baleenwhales ... See MoreSee Less
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